Saskatoon Office
10th Floor
Sturdy Stone Building
122 3rd Avenue North
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
S7K 2H6
Regina Office
1600 – 1920 Broad Street
Regina, Saskatchewan
S4P 3V2
(306)787-2406 (telephone)
(306)787-2664 (fax)

Who do I contact about a problem concerning hours of work, wages, overtime, holidays or holiday pay, meal or coffee breaks, maternity/parental leave ect.?

These issues fall under The Labour Standards Act and are dealt with by the Labour Relations and Mediation Division of Saskatchewan Ministry of Labour Relations and Workplace Safety. If you are unionized, you may also discuss these matters with your union representative.

Who do I contact about unsafe working conditions?

Occupational health and safety issues fall under The Occupational Health and Safety Act and are dealt with by the Occupational Health and Safety Branch of Saskatchewan Ministry of Labour Relations and Workplace Safety or by internal occupational health and safety committees in the workplace. If you are unionized, you may also discuss these matters with your union representative.

Who do I contact about harassment or discrimination in my workplace?

Allegations of harassment and discrimination in the workplace are generally dealt with by the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission or through an internal complaint process in the workplace. If you are unionized, you may also discuss these matters with your union representative.

What can I do if I am laid off or if my employment is terminated?

If you are unjustly laid off or terminated from a workplace that is not unionized, you should contact a lawyer or the Labour Standards Branch of Saskatchewan Ministry of Labour Relations and Workplace Safety for assistance.

If you are unjustly laid off or terminated from a workplace that is unionized, you should contact your union representative for assistance.

Does the Labour Relations Board represent me or act for me if I have an employment problem?

The Board is a neutral adjudicator of disputes -- it does not take the side of any party. Board staff can provide copies of legislation and forms and information about the Board's processes and decisions, but cannot provide legal advice or assistance on how to successfully conduct a case before the Board.

If you require legal advice or assistance, contact your lawyer. If you do not have a lawyer, the Law Society of Saskatchewan can refer you to a lawyer who practises labour law.

What duty does my union owe to me?

Section 25.1 of The Trade Union Act says that a union must fairly represent its members in grievance and arbitration proceedings. A union does not necessarily have to carry out the wishes of every employee or place the interests of one member above the interests of another member. As long as a union has not made an arbitrary, discriminatory or bad faith decision, it will have met its duty under s. 25.1.

If a union acts conscientiously and takes into account all relevant factors in making a decision, that decision is likely not arbitrary. A discriminatory decision is one which draws distinctions between union members on illegitimate grounds. A bad faith decision is one which is motivated by malice, hostility, favouritism or personal considerations.

Unless a union's decision is arbitrary, discriminatory or in bad faith, the Board will not find a breach of the duty of fair representation, even if the Board does not agree with the decision that the union made.

What are the standard bargaining units in the construction industry?

Since 1979 the Board has issued certification orders in the construction industry for standard trade-based units. Some examples of these standard units are:

Labourers:

All labourers and labourer foremen employed by name of employer within geographical area or boundary.

Carpenters:

All journeymen carpenters, carpenters, carpenter apprentices and carpenter foremen employed by name of employer within geographical area or boundary.

Electrical:

All journeymen electricians, electrician apprentices, electrical workers and electrician foremen employed by name of employer within geographical area or boundary.

Operating Engineers:

All operating engineers, operating engineer apprentices and operating engineer foremen employed by name of employer within geographical area or boundary.

Ironworkers:

All ironworkers, ironworker apprentices and ironworker foremen employed by name of employer within geographical area or boundary.

Sheet Metal:

All journeymen sheet metal workers, sheet metal workers, sheet metal worker apprentices and sheet metal worker foremen employed by name of employer within geographical area or boundary.

Boilermakers:

All boilermakers, boilermaker apprentices and boilermaker foremen employed by name of employer within geographical area or boundary.

Insulators:

All insulators, insulator apprentices and insulator foremen employed by name of employer within geographical area or boundary.

Painters:

All painters, painter apprentices and painter foremen employed by name of employer within geographical area or boundary.

Plumbing:

All journeymen plumbers, steam fitters, pipe fitters, gas fitters, refrigeration mechanics, instrumentation mechanics, sprinkler fitters and all apprentices and foremen connected with these trades employed by name of employer within geographical area or boundary.

Millwrights:

All millwrights, millwright foremen and millwright apprentices employed by name of employer within geographical area or boundary.

Note: These units are not pre-determinative and each situation and application requires the Board's consideration as to the appropriateness of the proposed bargaining unit.

Can I withdraw my support card filed on an application for certification or an application for recission?

An individual may seek to withdraw his or her support card by forwarding an original signed and dated request to this effect to the applicant and to the Board at:

1600-1920 Broad Street
Regina, Saskatchewan
S4P 3V2

Faxed and e-mailed requests will not be considered. The original request should contain a return address for the individual signing it.

Please note that the Board has a policy of not considering evidence of support or withdrawal of support filed with it after an application for certification or rescission is received (see s. 10 of The Trade Union Act)

How is the workplace certified?

For information on how to certify a workplace, click here.

How do we remove the union from the workplace?

For information on the removal of a union from a workplace, click here.

When can a union commence a strike?

Section 44 of The Trade Union Act says that a union may not commence a strike during the term of a collective bargaining agreement, and if applicable, the requirements under the Public Service Essential Services Act, have been met.

Where a collective agreement has expired and notice has been given under s. 33(4) of The Trade Union Act, the union may commence a strike if:

  1. A strike vote has been taken by secret ballot among the employees in the bargaining unit concerned who are affected by the collective bargaining and a majority of those employees voting have voted in favour of a strike.
  2. The union has given the employer or employer's agent at least 48 hours written notice of the date and time that the strike will commence and has promptly, after giving this notice, notified the Minister of Labour or the Minister's designate of the date and time that the strike will commence.

When can an employer commence a lock-out?

Section 44 of The Trade Union Act says that an employer may not commence a lock-out during the term of a collective bargaining agreement.

Where a collective agreement has expired and notice has been given under s. 33(4) of The Trade Union Act, the employer may commence a lock-out if:

  1. The employer has given the union or union's agent at least 48 hours written notice of the date and time that the lock-out will commence and has promptly, after giving this notice, notified the Minister of Labour or the Minister's designate of the date and time that the lock-out will commence.

How do I locate a specific board decision?

The Board’s Reasons for Decision are published in the Saskatchewan Labour Relations Board Reports (Sask. L.R.B.R.), and may be accessed through Canlii (at no cost).

The Board's Reasons for Decision are also published on Quicklaw and display on the Decisions page on this website.

If you do not have access to the Sask. L.R.B.R. or Quicklaw, you may request a copy of a specific Board decision from the Board at:

  • 1600-1920 Broad Street
    Regina, Saskatchewan
    S4P 3V2
    (306) 787-2406 (telephone)
    (306) 787-2664 (fax)
  • Or E-mail inquiries may be sent to the Board Registrar via the Contact Us Form.

Ideally, you should know the LRB file number of the case which you are seeking. If you do not have this information, we may be able to locate the decision if you can provide the names of both parties and the approximate date of the decision.

The Board's front line staff cannot provide research assistance such as locating a decision supporting a particular legal principle or dealing with a similar fact situation. In some cases the Board Registrar may be able to assist with this type of inquiry. 

How do I find out if a company is certified?

The Board keeps records of the certification orders that it has issued. These records are indexed by the name of the company at the time of certification.

To find out if a particular company is certified in Saskatchewan, simply make a written request to the Board’s Regina office at:

  • 1600-1920 Broad Street
    Regina, Saskatchewan
    S4P 3V2
    (306) 787-2406 (telephone)
    (306) 787-2664 (fax)
  • Or E-mail inquiries may be sent to the Board Registrar via the Contact Us Form.

The request must include the name of the company in question as at the date of certification and a return address to which the search results will be sent. There is presently no charge for this service.

Not all of the Board’s certification Order records are cross referenced by trade union. Board staff are therefore not able to search for certification orders by trade union, but will assist in any way possible.

For federally certified companies, contact the Canada Industrial Relations Board.